As Ireland Considers Repeal of Abortion Ban: Consider Women’s Health | Trending

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On May 25, Irish citizens are taking to the polls to vote in a referendum to amend the Eighth Amendment to the constitution, which effectively bans all abortion except for cases where the mother's life is at risk.

Voters have until 10:00pm (2100 GMT) on Friday to cast their ballots at some 6,500 polling stations, after which an exit poll of 3,000 voters will be released on national broadcaster RTE.

Counting does not begin until Saturday morning, with official result expected later in the day. He urged people to vote "yes" in favor of repeal.

She said her vote would be one for solidarity and compassion, "a vote to say, I don't send you away anymore".

"At no stage has the government held out its hand to these women and said, 'How can I help you?"

"So many women have travelled across to England to take care of their family and healthcare needs and I think it's a disgrace and it needs to change", said "Yes" voter Sophie O'Gara, 28, referring to women who travel to Britain for abortions.


Today in Ireland, thousands voted in a referendum that could force their government to introduce legislation that will legalize abortion for the first time since 1983.

Another Irish Times article reported that voter turnout was extremely high, possibly higher than it was when Ireland voted to legalize same-sex "marriage".

The polls closed on Friday night at 10pm.

The ballot paper does not mention the Eighth Amendment or abortion, instead asking: "Do you approve of the proposal to amend the Constitution contained in the undermentioned Bill?" He notes that the 8th amendment under review is a declaration of equality of life between the life of a woman and her unborn child, "both lives being precious, in need of protection, love, and the support of society and its laws".

Exit polls indicate that the highest Yes vote was in Dublin, with 77 percent.

Many expatriate Irish have travelled home to vote in one of the few European Union countries that does not allow those overseas to vote via post or in embassies.


Since 1983, around 170,000 Irish women have gone overseas for terminations.

For decades, conservatives have argued abortion doesn't just hurt babies but women too-but to be honest, that was hard to prove.

Tara Flynn, who 11 years ago flew to the Netherlands for an abortion, said she planned to vote "yes" to make sure future generations of women don't endure what she did, with feelings of isolation and shame.

The vote to repeal a constitutional ban on terminations except in cases where the mother's life is in danger was predicted to win by 68 percent to 32 percent, according to a poll of 4,000 voters conducted by Ipsos/ MRBI for the Irish Times.

Caoimhe Mulcahy, 27, an actor from County Clare in western Ireland, said it was a question of women's health and many had "really suffered" with unregulated, unsafe and illegal abortions.

Despite attempts by the campaigners to seemingly hijack the song, Sheeran previously confirmed that the track was written in honour of a "close friend" who had experienced a still-birth five months into her pregnancy.


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