Trump ex-campaign aide Manafort to plead guilty in Mueller probe

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Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has agreed a plea deal to avoid a second trial, USA media report.

The charges were filed in a superseding criminal information - a formal criminal charge - which lays out the facts of the offense and is often the precursor to the announcement of a deal.

Details of the deal are likely to emerge in a plea agreement hearing in federal court.

Manafort's cooperation came just ahead of a Washington, DC trial in which he faced charges of money laundering, obstruction of justice, and tax fraud, among other charges.


Prosecutors allege that Manafort, conspiring with his former business partner Richard Gates and Russian associate Konstantin Kilimnik, illegally lobbied on behalf of a foreign government by failing to register as a foreign agent.

Manafort was accused of concealing from the IRS tens of millions of dollars in proceeds from his Ukrainian patrons and conspiring to launder that money through offshore accounts in Cyprus and elsewhere. Regarding the Washington case, Manafort was accused of acting as an unregistered foreign agent, conspiring to launder money, and lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Justice Department about the nature of his work.

It comes three weeks after Paul Manafort was convicted in a separate trial on eight counts related to financial fraud, and as the Mueller investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian Federation increasingly pressures the White House.

The trial included testimony for the prosecution from Manafort's longtime aide, Rick Gates, who pleaded guilty to lying to federal authorities and agreed to co-operate with the special counsel probe. But Manafort has not been charged with anything related to the campaign.


Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has cut a "cooperation agreement" with prosecutors and intends to plead guilty to charges related to his Ukrainian consulting work.

During Manafort's first trial, Judge Ellis often butted heads with federal prosecutors. Yet, Jackson said the request appeared to relate more to concerns about the political affiliation of Washington residents, rather than a unique amount of pretrial publicity.

Manafort made a similar unsuccessful request in his bank fraud and tax evasion trial in northern Virginia.

Manafort directed his lobbyists to "plant some stink" on Tyomoshenko by alleging in USA news stories that she paid for the murder of a Ukrainian official. A mistrial was declared on the remaining 10 charges after jurors could not reach a unanimous verdict.


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